Collection: Keith Haring

In 1978, Keith Haring made a momentous move to New York City, igniting his journey as an artist by using the sprawling metropolis as his expansive canvas. In the depths of subway stations, he wielded chalk to craft mesmerizing drawings, marking the inception of his artistic odyssey. His creations transcended the underground realm, eventually gracing public murals, pulsating nightclubs, revered galleries, and prestigious museums worldwide. Beyond his artistic prowess, Haring became a renowned advocate for AIDS awareness, leaving an indelible mark on society.

Born on May 4, 1958, in Reading, Pennsylvania, Haring's early influences were rooted in the enchanting worlds of Walt Disney, Charles Schultz's cartoons, and the whimsical illustrations of Dr. Seuss. His father, an engineer with a penchant for cartooning, nurtured Keith's creative spirit through countless hours of collaborative drawing sessions.

After graduating from high school in 1976, Haring briefly flirted with formal art education at the Ivy School of Professional Art in Pittsburgh, but his passion for artistic self-expression beckoned him elsewhere. In 1978, he embarked on a transformative journey back to school, setting his course for New York City, where he enrolled at the School of Visual Arts.

In the vibrant underbelly of New York's burgeoning underground art scene, Haring found kindred spirits in emerging talents like Jean-Michel Basquiat and Kenny Scharf. They shared an affinity for the colorful and transgressive graffiti art that adorned the city's streets. Together, they organized groundbreaking exhibitions at downtown nightclubs and unconventional venues, converging art, music, and fashion into a captivating fusion.

Venturing beyond the realm of nightclubs, Haring harnessed the city's vast landscape as his canvas. Commuting through the subway, he noticed the vacant advertising panels on station walls – blank black canvases waiting to be transformed. Armed with white chalk, he infused these spaces with his trademark motifs: dancing figures, the "radiant baby" emitting celestial rays, a spirited barking dog, flying saucers, colossal hearts, and enigmatic figures with televisions for heads. His distinctive graffiti captivated both New York commuters and the watchful eye of city authorities, leading to numerous arrests for vandalism.

Haring's creative journey evolved as he transposed his universally recognizable imagery onto standalone drawings and paintings. Vibrant lines and bold colors conveyed a palpable energy and optimism that resonated widely. In 1981, he showcased his art in his first solo exhibition at the Westbeth Painters Space in Manhattan. Two years later, the Tony Shafrazi Gallery became his artistic home for the rest of his illustrious career. Throughout the 1980s, Haring's work received international acclaim, and he engaged in collaborations with luminaries such as Andy Warhol, Grace Jones, and William S. Burroughs.

Always driven to make art accessible to the masses, Haring established the Pop Shop in New York City's SoHo neighborhood in 1986. This innovative store offered an array of affordable items adorned with his iconic designs, including posters and T-shirts. Over his abbreviated career, Haring completed over 50 public works, including the impactful anti-drug mural "Crack is Wack" in a Harlem playground and an illuminated, animated billboard featuring his beloved "radiant baby" in New York's iconic Times Square. Additionally, he conducted numerous art workshops for children, further amplifying his impact on future generations.

In 1988, Keith Haring received a devastating diagnosis of AIDS, igniting his resolve to create change. The following year, he established the Keith Haring Foundation, dedicated to supporting children's programs and initiatives aimed at raising AIDS awareness.

On February 16, 1990, Haring succumbed to AIDS-related complications in New York, leaving behind an enduring legacy. His art continues to grace galleries worldwide, with prestigious institutions such as the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, and the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, France, proudly housing his masterpieces. Haring's seemingly simple yet profound style, brimming with themes of love, mortality, conflict, and societal harmony, continues to captivate and resonate deeply with audiences across the globe.

End To End Gallery is thrilled to showcase an exclusive curated collection featuring Limited Edition Hand Signed and Numbered Screen Prints and Lithographs by the iconic Keith Haring.

23 products
  • Keith Haring 'Untitled' (Original)
    Keith Haring 'Untitled' (Original)
    Regular price
    $70,000.00
    Sale price
    $70,000.00
  • Keith Haring 'Untitled (Free South Africa): one plate, 1985'
    Keith Haring 'Untitled (Free South Africa): one plate, 1985'
    Regular price
    $53,000.00
    Sale price
    $53,000.00
  • Keith Haring 'Apocalypse 6'
    Keith Haring 'Apocalypse 6'
    Regular price
    $47,500.00
    Sale price
    $47,500.00
  • Keith Haring 'Untitled (Plate 13 Photostat from the Blueprint Drawings)'
    Keith Haring 'Untitled (Plate 13 Photostat from the Blueprint Drawings)'
    Regular price
    $45,500.00
    Sale price
    $45,500.00
  • Keith Haring 'Untitled (Plate 6 from the Blueprint Drawings)'
    Keith Haring 'Untitled (Plate 6 from the Blueprint Drawings)'
    Regular price
    $45,500.00
    Sale price
    $45,500.00
  • Keith Haring 'Untitled (Plate 5 from the Blueprint Drawings)'
    Keith Haring 'Untitled (Plate 5 from the Blueprint Drawings)'
    Regular price
    $45,500.00
    Sale price
    $45,500.00
  • Keith Haring 'Untitled (D), 1987'
    Keith Haring 'Untitled (D), 1987'
    Regular price
    Sold out
    Sale price
    $35,000.00
  • Keith Haring 'Apocalypse 2'
    Keith Haring 'Apocalypse 2'
    Regular price
    $27,500.00
    Sale price
    $27,500.00
  • Keith Haring 'Apocalypse 10'
    Keith Haring 'Apocalypse 10'
    Regular price
    $27,500.00
    Sale price
    $27,500.00